Animals Adapt To Climate Heat, But Too Slowly

Animals Adapt To Climate Heat, But Too Slowly

Great tits are among the species which show an ability to adapt. Image: By Martin Arusalu on Unsplash

Can animals adapt to climate change? And if so, can species adapt fast enough to ensure survival? Reports so far are not promising.

German scientists have an answer to the great question of species survival: can animals adapt to climate change? The answer, based on close analysis of 10,000 studies, is a simple one. They may be able to adapt, but not fast enough.

The question is a serious one. Earth is home to many millions of species that have evolved – and adapted or gone extinct – with successive dramatic shifts in climate over the last 500 million years.

The rapid heating of the planet in a climate emergency driven by profligate fossil fuel use threatens a measurable shift in climate conditions and is in any case coincident with what looks like the beginning of a mass extinction that could match any recorded in the rocks of the Permian, or other extinctions linked with global climate change.

The difference is that climate is now changing at a rate far faster than any previous episode. So can those animals that cannot migrate to cooler climates adjust to changing conditions?

“Even populations undergoing adaptive change do so at a pace that does not guarantee their persistence”

A team from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research in Berlin and more than 60 colleagues from around the world report in the journal Nature Communications that they examined whether creatures could change either their physiology, size or behaviour to accommodate a rise in temperature accompanied by a change in the timing of the seasons. Biologists call this kind of response “phenotypic change.”

Questions like these are not easily answered. To be sure, the biologists needed reliable local records of temperatures across a number of locations. Then they needed sure information about the timing of migration, reproduction, hibernation and other big events in the lives of their subjects over a number of years.

And then they needed to find case studies where data had been collected over many generations in one population of creatures in one space.

And having found changes in the traits of their selected creatures, the biologists had to work out whether such changes led to higher levels of survival, or more offspring. They found reliable information about 17 species in 13 countries.

Pessimism alert

In the end, most of their data came from studies of birds, among them common and abundant species such as the great tit Parus major, the common magpie Pica pica or the European pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca.

The message is that even if bird populations can change with their environmental conditions, they may not be able to do so at the speed necessary to time migrations to coincide with ever-earlier spring flowering, or nesting to match the explosion of insect populations that provide food for nestlings.

“Even populations undergoing adaptive change do so at a pace that does not guarantee their persistence,” said Alexandre Courtiol of the Leibniz Institute. And the data available apply to species that are known to cope relatively well with changing conditions.

“Adaptive responses among rare or endangered species remain to be analysed,” said his colleague and co-author Stephanie Kramer-Schadt, a Liebniz ecologist. “We fear that the forecasts of population persistence for such species of conservation concern will be even more pessimistic.” − Climate News Network

About the Author

Tim Radford, freelance journalistTim Radford is a freelance journalist. He worked for The Guardian for 32 years, becoming (among other things) letters editor, arts editor, literary editor and science editor. He won the Association of British Science Writers award for science writer of the year four times. He served on the UK committee for the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. He has lectured about science and the media in dozens of British and foreign cities. 

Science that Changed the World: The untold story of the other 1960s revolutionBook by this Author:

Science that Changed the World: The untold story of the other 1960s revolution
by Tim Radford.

Click here for more info and/or to order this book on Amazon. (Kindle book)

This Article Originally Appeared On Climate News Network

Related Books

Climate Adaptation Finance and Investment in California

by Jesse M. Keenan
0367026074This book serves as a guide for local governments and private enterprises as they navigate the unchartered waters of investing in climate change adaptation and resilience. This book serves not only as a resource guide for identifying potential funding sources but also as a roadmap for asset management and public finance processes. It highlights practical synergies between funding mechanisms, as well as the conflicts that may arise between varying interests and strategies. While the main focus of this work is on the State of California, this book offers broader insights for how states, local governments and private enterprises can take those critical first steps in investing in society’s collective adaptation to climate change. Available On Amazon

Nature-Based Solutions to Climate Change Adaptation in Urban Areas: Linkages between Science, Policy and Practice

by Nadja Kabisch, Horst Korn, Jutta Stadler, Aletta Bonn
3030104176
This open access book brings together research findings and experiences from science, policy and practice to highlight and debate the importance of nature-based solutions to climate change adaptation in urban areas. Emphasis is given to the potential of nature-based approaches to create multiple-benefits for society.

The expert contributions present recommendations for creating synergies between ongoing policy processes, scientific programmes and practical implementation of climate change and nature conservation measures in global urban areas. Available On Amazon

A Critical Approach to Climate Change Adaptation: Discourses, Policies and Practices

by Silja Klepp, Libertad Chavez-Rodriguez
9781138056299This edited volume brings together critical research on climate change adaptation discourses, policies, and practices from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Drawing on examples from countries including Colombia, Mexico, Canada, Germany, Russia, Tanzania, Indonesia, and the Pacific Islands, the chapters describe how adaptation measures are interpreted, transformed, and implemented at grassroots level and how these measures are changing or interfering with power relations, legal pluralismm and local (ecological) knowledge. As a whole, the book challenges established perspectives of climate change adaptation by taking into account issues of cultural diversity, environmental justicem and human rights, as well as feminist or intersectional approaches. This innovative approach allows for analyses of the new configurations of knowledge and power that are evolving in the name of climate change adaptation. Available On Amazon

From The Publisher:
Purchases on Amazon go to defray the cost of bringing you InnerSelf.comelf.com, MightyNatural.com, and ClimateImpactNews.com at no cost and without advertisers that track your browsing habits. Even if you click on a link but don't buy these selected products, anything else you buy in that same visit on Amazon pays us a small commission. There is no additional cost to you, so please contribute to the effort. You can also use this link to use to Amazon at any time so you can help support our efforts.

 

enafarzh-CNzh-TWdanltlfifrdeiwhihuiditjakomsnofaplptruesswsvthtrukurvi

follow InnerSelf on

facebook-icontwitter-iconrss-icon

 Get The Latest By Email

{emailcloak=off}

LATEST VIDEOS

South Africans Are Feeling The Heat In More Ways Than One
by eNCA
Load-shedding combined with soaring temperatures are a bad combination.
Why Uncertainty Can Actually Boost Trust In Climate Science
Why Uncertainty Can Actually Boost Trust In Climate Science
by Melissa De Witte
The more specific climate scientists are about the uncertainties of global warming, the more the American public trusts…
How World Conflicts Are Influence By The Changing Climate
How World Conflicts Are Influence By The Changing Climate
by John Vidal
The relationship between a heating planet and violent clashes is complex — and critical. “This is where I keep my…
Emergency Medicine For Our Climate Fever
by Kelly Wanser
As we recklessly warm the planet by pumping greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, some industrial emissions also…
What Extinction Rebellion climate activists are demanding from governments
by Democracy Now!
More than 700 climate activists were arrested in 60 cities worldwide in a global effort aimed at urging governments to…
Can Nature Repair The Planet From Climate Change?
by The Economist
A closer look at one of the most familiar responses offered to the climate crisis.
How Climate Change Is Threatening Homes In Mumbai
by South China Morning Post
Lowland cities and islands such as the Indian city of Mumbai may face increasingly frequent floods and storms
This is Not A Drill: 700+ Arrested as Extinction Rebellion Fights Climate Crisis With Direct Action
by Democracy Now!
More than 700 people have been arrested in civil disobedience actions as the group Extinction Rebellion kicked off two…

LATEST ARTICLES

How Divergent Goals Hinder The Fight Of The Climate Crisis
How Divergent Goals Hinder The Fight Of The Climate Crisis
by Pascale Dufour
Nearly half a million people demonstrated in Montréal to demand climate action on Sept. 27. It was one of the largest…
Why You Shouldn't Use
Why You Shouldn't Use "Weather" And "Climate" Interchangeably
by Jennifer Fitchett
As January 2019 entered its third week, huge swathes of the US are blanketed with snow, and winter storm warnings were…
South Africans Are Feeling The Heat In More Ways Than One
by eNCA
Load-shedding combined with soaring temperatures are a bad combination.
Iowa's Farmers – And American Eaters – Need A National Discussion On Transforming Us Agriculture
We Need A National Discussion On Transforming Agriculture
by Lisa Schulte Moore
Iowa’s first-in-the-nation caucuses bring the state a lot of political attention during presidential election cycles.
Can We Deal With The Climate Crisis Without Having A Financial Chaos?
Can We Deal With The Climate Crisis Without Having A Financial Chaos?
by Geoff Dembicki
Communities face a tricky dilemma as climate changes: How to prepare for impacts without scaring away homeowners and…
Should Science Must Be Mobilized Like World War Ii To Fight The Climate Crisis
Should Science Must Be Mobilized Like World War Ii To Fight The Climate Crisis
by Tom Oliver
We’ve all but won the argument on climate change. The facts are now unequivocal and climate denialists are facing a…
The IEA Projects Global Renewable Energy Capacity to Rise by 50% in next 5 Years
The IEA Projects Global Renewable Energy Capacity to Rise by 50% in next 5 Years
by Jessica Corbett
However, the deployment of renewables "still needs to accelerate if we are to achieve long-term climate, air quality,…
Evidence Shows Warming Forces World Of Ice Into Retreat
New Evidence Shows Warming Forces World Of Ice Into Retreat
by Tim Radford
New evidence from the air, space, atmospheric chemistry and old records is testament to global warming impacts on the…